Architecture Criticism
By Christian Narkiewicz-Laine

BERTRAND GOLDBERG (1913-1997)
October, 1997



The death of every of the world’s most important intellects admonishes. So it was today, that the esteemed Chicago architect, Bertrand Goldberg has passed into a greater eternity. Goldberg was everything a great architect should be: visionary, humanist, cultured, intellectual, and on the Left.  Read more

STANLEY TIGERMAN: USING DESIGN AS A WEAPON AND BAD JOKE
Chicago Sun-Times, December 23, 1979


The latest architectural one-liner by the firm of Stanley Tigerman Associates (known for Tigerman's acute tongue-in-cheek irreverence, pranks and rabbit punches) is the addition the Anti-Cruely Society's facility at 157 W. Grand.  Tigerman refers to it as 'a dog-killing machine.' This is not one of Tigerman's usual architectural leg-pulls, nor is it a simple joke.  The project has serious implications on the ethics of architectural design and practice.  Read more

AALTO’S HEIGHTS OF HUMANISM
Chicago Sun-Times, October 7, 1979

AALTO ALVARO

At the end of this century, only a handful of architects will earn the title humanist. History, however, will bestow endless laurels on Alvar Aalto, the Finnish architect, who died in 1976, for his conscientious , humane approach to modern design and building. Read more

THE ARCHITECTURE OF SILENCE INTERVIEW WITH LUIS BARRAGÁN
Tacubaya, Miguel Hidalgo, México City July, 1981


Philip Johnson arranged this once in a life-time opportunity to interview one of the most influential architects of the 20th-Century.  Luis Barragán was 80 years old and not in good health.  I arrived in México City on a warm May afternoon and made my way to Luis Barragán's private residence outside the historic town of Tacubaya, in the Miguel Hidalgo borough of México City, which also served as his atelier.  Read more

Jean-Paul Sartre’s View of Urban Life
The Chicago Sun-Times, April 27, 1980


“One must not forget the heavy boredom that weighs over America.”—American cities are centers of urban contrast, weightless, transient and volumeless objects, cultural vacuums and caravan cemeteries where the poor and the rich coexist in a strange, awkward alliance.  Read more

 

Adolfo Pérez Esquivel‘s Nobel Peace Prize
Inland Architect December 1980


Argentine architect, sculptor, and human rights activist, Adolfo Pérez Esquivel, leader of the prominent Latin American organization that promote humanitarian interests within the regions of the hemisphere was this year’s recipient of the Nobel Peace Prize.  Read more

 


ICONOCLAST ARCHITECT
An Interview with Aldo Rossi


In his book, The Architecture of the City,” Rossi shows the dialectical relationship between architecture and the city, refuting the formalism that considers architecture as an object or as merely a technological fact.  Read More

LE CORBUSIER’S FAILED MODERNISM
Chandigahr: An Historic Monument for the Brave New World


 
“To build Chandigarh meant crossing many centuries; and to cross it, as it were, by foot.  The city was built by hand, and carried on the heads of women…each brick carted as it was 4,000 years ago.” Read more

HENRI LEFEBVRE’S MARXIST MEMORY OF THE CITY
A Living Portrait of the Dying City



Paris—“a museum of misery…the image of what has disappeared forever.”—Henri Lefebvre.

Finally, there is an accurate and emotional document on the fate of the modern city; a dilemma, a plague of conscience, the wrath of human exploitation and senselessness, irresponsibilityRead more

THE INTELLECTUAL DEATH OF ARCHITECTURE
The Politics of Humanism



Thus a dialectic is to be played, face to face, between society and architecture.  Each subject is being approached from a dual point-of-view, by opposing speakers from both sides—Spanish architect, Rafael de la Hoz. Read more